THE COOKING AT SEA SERIES

COOKING AT ANCHOR







 PASSAGE PROVISIONING LIST

how
                    to provision a boat for an ocean crossing. passage
                    planning or every boat and yacht owner in a galleyPrint a PDF of the free list here 

COOKING ON A BOAT OR A YACHT OR BOAT AT ANCHOR
              PRACTICAL BOAT COOK


OVERVIEW


The hook is down and for once the boat is upright.  How and what do you cook at anchor?

You deserve that long ice cold G&T, but not too many as you have to get cooking.  First things first, where are you?  Is your anchorage up a long forgotten river or are you parked in front of a well stocked supermarket?  Either way, let's assume that food is 'a-plenty'.

No matter where you drop the anchor it is now the time to get provisioning.  This might be a case of scouring dusty sun baked streets for fresh mangoes or savoring the ready made delights in an air-conditioned supermarket

Once you have provisioned you also need to think about how you cook, is it on gas or perhaps you use a solar oven.  One thing is for certain it is a great opportunity for a BBQ

Depending upon where you are then it's also a great opportunity to go fishing, whether this is a simple hook over the side of the boat, running around the anchorage with the dinghy or putting out the lobster pot (lobster recipes and more). REMEMBER TO TAKE NOTE OF ANY LOCAL FISHING LAWS

The water tanks are full and you're not running short on gas - and it's not just the boat's batteries that are charged so are yours - let's get going.

If you've been living on snacks and one pot meals for a while then now is the time to 'push the boat out'.


BASIC COOKING PRINCIPLES TO GET YOU STARTED


A bit more about food

 
How much food you should eat depends on many factors, including your height, age, sex, general state of health, level of activity and what medications you may be on.


There are basically 4 food groups:

Fruit & vegetables:  Experts say you should consume at least one dark green and one orange colored vegetable every day. 
Grains:  It is widely considered that whole grains are better for you than processed ones. Go for variety, such as wild rice, quinoa, oats, brown rice, and barley. Whole grain pasta, oatmeal and breads are better for you than those made from refined cereals. A good grain should not have a high sugar, salt or fat content.  However, sometimes white bread smothered in butter does the trick better than chewy brown bread with a low fat spread - moderation is the key!
Dairy & alternatives:
Try low fat milk, it's good for your calcium and vitamin D levels. If you don't drink milk, have fortified drinks. When selecting dairy products, select low fat ones. 
Meat & alternatives:
- Try alternatives to meat occasionally, lentils make great sauces for spaghetti or lasagna, chilli beans are quick and easy. You're on a boat, so fish, fresh seared tuna should become a passage staple.  And don't forget all that sushi.


When eating carbohydrates try to go for slow release varieties. Avoid saturated fats and trans fats (spreads etc...) as much as possible, plant oils, fish and nuts are the best sources. Make sure you are getting plenty of fiber. When eating fruit and vegetables eat a variety of colors. If you are not a great milk drinker, make sure your consumption of calcium is adequate.  Hopefully with a little preparation you will eat as well as, if not better than on shore - especially the fresh fish.